Research

Dynamical Systems and Individual Differences


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Quantitative Psychology

My Curriculum Vitae

Please consult my CV for my most recent projects.


Quantifying Concordance in a Dynamical Pair

One of my current projects looks to assess the degree of concordance/discordance between a mother-child dyadic pair across a longitudinal timeframe (i.e., 9- to 17-years of age). The study utilizes dynamical correlation to assess the unique degree of concordance mother-child pairs possess above and beyond the average-level trends present within the data.

This talk was presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association in April, 2018.
The slides can be found here

Iterative and Automatic Test Construction in Item Response Theory (IRT)

In psychological research, IRT is often seen as a cumbersome and difficult process to undertake. To address these concerns, a portion of my research is concerned with explicitly comparing outcomes produced by classically derived assessments of psychological constructs (i.e., factor scores and/or ordinary summed scores) to those produced by scores derived from IRT. Ultimately, the goal of this facet of my research is to elucidate upon the tangible benefits of IRT over classical methods to justify the greater 'work load' and 'difficulty' associated with IRT methods.

This research has manifested itself as an iterative selection algorithm that takes item responses and generates optimal tests based on model fit. This algorithm that we've developed reduces the time to construct scales while preserving the 'locality of information'. This algorithm currently works on 2PL and 3PL IRT frameworks. Plans are to extend this algorithm to work with the polytomous models of IRT as well.

See us at IMPS 2018 at Columbia University to hear more!


Past Work

My thesis and subsequent published work pertained to the utilization of IRT test equating procedures--specifically the Haebara characteristic curve method--to render the scores of multiple informants comparable across a longitudinal timeframes of 8-years (i.e., 9-measurement periods).

A substantial amount of literature currently exists suggesting the relative ineffectiveness of negatively worded items (NWIs) in psychological assessment. My research has focused on utilizing IRT test equating procedures to render positively worded and negatively worded items equivalent with regard to construct validity.

Collaborators

I am blessed to be able to collaborate with the following extraordinary people/researchers:
Deshawn Sambrano
Netasha Pizano
My MA advisor, Dr. Kathleen Preston
My thesis committee member, Dr. Jessica Tessler
The Fullerton Longitudinal Study

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